In stead of writing myself, I'll just quote an interview that Bill Shapiro (former editor-in-chief of LIFE magazine and Editor of Getty Images FOTO) did with me. And do have a look at his very interesting feed on photographers

Where do you live?

 Stockholm, Sweden but raised in The Netherlands.

Are you a full-time photographer? If so, how long have you been doing this professionally?

 No, but was seriously bitten by the photo bug early 80s when I got my Canon A-1 and have since then nurtured a dream of making photography my profession.

If not, what's your "day" job?

 Market economist but quit my career at 52 when I had the chance. Consider myself early retired with ample time and freedom to explore and contemplate life through travel and photography.

I know you shoot all kinds of stuff but I'm primarily interested in the silo/prairie pictures. How did you get interested in these? What first caught your eye? And how long have you been shooting them?

 The agricultural setting reminds me of my mother’s roots in North Sweden where my grand parents were farmers long ago. Road trips through South Western USA during the 80’s, the solace of their deserts struck me. In Canada recently I found the same emotion on their prairies.

 At the same time grain elevators (silos) have always intrigued me for their massive size, windowless monolithic design and because we cannot experience them in Europe. A trip to Canada in 2018 gave me a feeling of their context as well and I was instantaneously mesmerized. Prairies and deserts are places where I feel totally at peace.

Why have you focused on them?

 I think old buildings in general that have survived human generations becoming beacons over times and people gone by, they make us remember and reflect or own mortality and the surprising changeability of what we think are stable constructs.

 Moreover, for me they are still “new” and I see them in a fresh light, they still thrill me with their many small nuances. Moreover, they are disappearing right in front of our eyes: in Saskatchewan about 90% are gone. 

What are you trying to capture and convey in these pictures? Either in terms of formal elements or in terms of emotion. Or both! Or something else.

 Awe and a feeling of putting on the brakes and wanting to absorb the bigger picture of things.

                                              

What sort of moment or scene catches your eye? What are the qualities of a prairie silo that make you say, "Yeah, that's the one!"

 The most interesting shots are of silos that stand open and alone in the midst of the prairie, like cathedrals withstanding the elements of time and signalling sublime human presence and endeavour. People are undeniably central in the story but not the main subject photographically.

How do you know when you've nailed the picture?

 That’s a combination of subjective optical, abstract balance and enough context to appreciate their size and otherworldly appearance.

What, if anything, are you hoping that your viewer feels upon seeing your work?

 Wow …. What a place, I wish I were there

My little write-ups are meant to be very accessible and not heavy on the tech, but what do you shoot with?

 Digital, Canon 5DIV. Prefer distance shots as to minimize the rounding effect of a wide angle (awful), so preferably 50 – 300mm

Whose work influences you, if anyone. And if not, totally fine. Mostly I'm just curious.

 I always had an interest in frontal technical drawings from the times my dad developed factories, and I started shooting straight projections of old buildings and factories.

  Some have told me my work remind them of the Bechers, which may be true, but I really got my kicks from Wim Wenders (while he planned his movie “Paris, Texas”). His pictures totally blew me away through their matter-of-factedness in depicting mundane towns in rural USA, playing with lines, flats and colours. Other early influences are Joel Meyerowitz, Edward Hopper and the great Wright Morris. The Bechers not so much but for their fascination for typologies.

Anything else you want to add?

 Visit those grain elevators before they are gone!

Where do you live?

 Stockholm, Sweden but raised in The Netherlands.

Are you a full-time photographer? If so, how long have you been doing this professionally?

 No, but was seriously bitten by the photo bug early 80s when I got my Canon A-1 and have since then nurtured a dream of making photography my profession.

If not, what's your "day" job?

 Market economist but quit my career at 52 when I had the chance. Consider myself early retired with ample time and freedom to explore and contemplate life through travel and photography.

I know you shoot all kinds of stuff but I'm primarily interested in the silo/prairie pictures. How did you get interested in these? What first caught your eye? And how long have you been shooting them?

 The agricultural setting reminds me of my mother’s roots in North Sweden where my grand parents were farmers long ago. Road trips through South Western USA during the 80’s, the solace of their deserts struck me. In Canada recently I found the same emotion on their prairies.

 At the same time grain elevators (silos) have always intrigued me for their massive size, windowless monolithic design and because we cannot experience them in Europe. A trip to Canada in 2018 gave me a feeling of their context as well and I was instantaneously mesmerized. Prairies and deserts are places where I feel totally at peace.

Why have you focused on them?

 I think old buildings in general that have survived human generations becoming beacons over times and people gone by, they make us remember and reflect or own mortality and the surprising changeability of what we think are stable constructs.

 Moreover, for me they are still “new” and I see them in a fresh light, they still thrill me with their many small nuances. Moreover, they are disappearing right in front of our eyes: in Saskatchewan about 90% are gone. 

What are you trying to capture and convey in these pictures? Either in terms of formal elements or in terms of emotion. Or both! Or something else.

 Awe and a feeling of putting on the brakes and wanting to absorb the bigger picture of things.

                                              

What sort of moment or scene catches your eye? What are the qualities of a prairie silo that make you say, "Yeah, that's the one!"

 The most interesting shots are of silos that stand open and alone in the midst of the prairie, like cathedrals withstanding the elements of time and signalling sublime human presence and endeavour. People are undeniably central in the story but not the main subject photographically.

How do you know when you've nailed the picture?

 That’s a combination of subjective optical, abstract balance and enough context to appreciate their size and otherworldly appearance.

What, if anything, are you hoping that your viewer feels upon seeing your work?

 Wow …. What a place, I wish I were there

My little write-ups are meant to be very accessible and not heavy on the tech, but what do you shoot with?

 Digital, Canon 5DIV. Prefer distance shots as to minimize the rounding effect of a wide angle (awful), so preferably 50 – 300mm

Whose work influences you, if anyone. And if not, totally fine. Mostly I'm just curious.

 I always had an interest in frontal technical drawings from the times my dad developed factories, and I started shooting straight projections of old buildings and factories.

  Some have told me my work remind them of the Bechers, which may be true, but I really got my kicks from Wim Wenders (while he planned his movie “Paris, Texas”). His pictures totally blew me away through their matter-of-factedness in depicting mundane towns in rural USA, playing with lines, flats and colours. Other early influences are Joel Meyerowitz, Edward Hopper and the great Wright Morris. The Bechers not so much but for their fascination for typologies.

Anything else you want to add?

 Visit those grain elevators before they are gone!